Normal Climb

The entry into a climb from a hover has already been described in the Normal Takeoff from a Hover subsection; therefore, this discussion is limited to a climb entry from cruising flight. Technique To enter a climb in a helicopter while maintaining airspeed, the first actions are increasing the collective and throttle, and adjusting the pedals as necessary to […]

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Helicopter Turns

Technique  Before beginning any turn, the area in the direction of the turn must be cleared not only at the helicopter’s altitude, but also above and below. To enter a turn from straight-and-level flight, apply sideward pressure on the cyclic in the direction the turn is to be made. This is the only control movement needed to start the turn. Do […]

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Straight-and-Level Flight

Straight-and-level flight is flight in which constant altitude and heading are maintained. The attitude of the rotor disk relative to the horizon determines the airspeed. The horizontal stabilizer design determines the helicopter’s attitude when stabilized at an airspeed and altitude. Altitude is primarily controlled by use of the collective. Technique To maintain forward flight, the rotor tip-path plane must be tilted […]

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Crosswind Considerations During Takeoffs

If the takeoff is made during crosswind conditions, the helicopter is flown in a slip during the early stages of the maneuver. [Figure 9-8] The cyclic is held into the wind a sufficient amount to maintain the desired ground track for the takeoff. The heading is maintained with the use of the antitorque pedals. In other words, the rotor is […]

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Normal Takeoff From the Surface

Normal takeoff from the surface is used to move the helicopter from a position on the surface into effective translational lift and a normal climb using a minimum amount of power. If the surface is dusty or covered with loose snow, this technique provides the most favorable visibility conditions and reduces the possibility of debris being ingested by the engine. […]

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Normal Takeoff From a Hover

A normal takeoff from a hover is an orderly transition to forward flight and is executed to increase altitude safely and expeditiously. During the takeoff, fly a profile that avoids the cross-hatched or shaded areas of the height-velocity diagram. Technique Refer to Figure 9-7 (position 1). Bring the helicopter to a hover and make a performance check, which includes power, balance, […]

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Helicopter Taxiing

Taxiing refers to operations on or near the surface of taxiways or other prescribed routes. Helicopters utilize three different types of taxiing. Hover Taxi A hover taxi is used when operating below 25 feet above ground level (AGL). [Figure 9-4] Since hover taxi is just like forward, sideward, or rearward hovering flight, the technique to perform it is not presented […]

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Hovering—Rearward Flight

Rearward hovering flight may be necessary to move the helicopter to a specific area when the situation is such that forward or sideward hovering flight cannot be used. During the maneuver, maintain a constant groundspeed, altitude, and heading. Due to the limited visibility behind a helicopter, it is important that the area behind the helicopter be cleared before beginning the maneuver. […]

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Hovering—Sideward Flight

Sideward hovering flight may be necessary to move the helicopter to a specific area when conditions make it impossible to use forward flight. During the maneuver, a constant groundspeed, altitude, and heading should be maintained. Technique Before starting sideward hovering flight, ensure the area for the hover is clear, especially at the tail rotor. Constantly monitor hover height and tail rotor […]

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Hovering—Forward Flight

Forward hovering flight is normally used to move a helicopter to a specific location, and it may begin from a stationary hover. During the maneuver, constant groundspeed, altitude, and heading should be maintained. Technique Before starting, pick out two references directly in front and in line with the helicopter. These reference points should be kept in line throughout the maneuver. […]

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Hovering Turn

A hovering turn is a maneuver performed at hovering altitude in which the nose of the helicopter is rotated either left or right while maintaining position over a reference point on the surface. Hovering turns can also be made around the mast or tail of the aircraft. The maneuver requires the coordination of all flight controls and demands precise control […]

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